2 thoughts on “Nessa”

  1. SHAKESPEARE?
    “Really, Shakespeare.” Yes we have all heard of the english poet William Shakespeare who is famous for his plays. He is well known for his plays and the themes resembled through the plays he wrote, like the romance shown through “Macbeth” and “Romeo and Juliet,” individuality and an epic love story shown in the “Taming of the Shrew,” revenge represented in “Hamlet” and gender identity and the troubles of love shown in “The Twelfth Night.” But are these plays still relevant today? Yes, believe me I know Shakespeare can get quite boring, but if we argued that Shakespeare shouldn’t be taught and that it isn’t relevant to students today, then some of the greatest movies of all time wouldn’t exist. Most of you might not have heard of some of Shakespeare’s plays but you would have definitely heard of movies that have been made based on his plays, like “Romeo and Juliet” which is based on Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” “10 Things I Hate About You” based on the “Taming of the Shrew,” “She’s the Man” based on “The Twelfth Night” and “The Lion King” based on “Hamlet” and there are so many more.

    “10 Things I Hate About You” is based on one of Shakespeare’s play’s “The Taming of the Shrew.” If you haven’t watched “10 Things I Hate About You” then I suggest that you do, it is definitely one of my favourite movies. Anyway so “10 Things I Hate About You” and the “Taming of the Shrew” are very similar apart from a few differences including the names of all the characters. “10 Things I Hate About You” is about a new kid Cameron James who immediately falls in love with a girl called Bianca Stratford. But Bianca’s dad, Walter Stratford won’t let Bianca date until her older sister Kat does. But that’s a problem as Kat is an outcast. So Cameron gets his friend Michael to ask another boy called Joey, who also likes Bianca, to pay a guy called Patrick to take out Kat so Cameron and “Joey” can take out Bianca and there’s more but I don’t want to spoil anything for you if you haven’t seen it. “10 Things I Hate About You” and Shakespeare’s play – “The Taming of the Shrew” is still relevant for us as teenagers today as the main character Kat isn’t afraid to be herself and it helps to show us that we as teenagers need to understand that we shouldn’t be afraid of what others will think of us and just to be ourselves. At the end of “10 Things I Hate About You,” Kat writes a sonnet about Patrick, take a look at it here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OC0_WmotPR0

    Another movie you might not have known was based on one of Shakespeare’s play’s, I sure didn’t know it was until I started learning about Shakespeare, is “She’s the Man.” The play that “She’s the Man” is based on, is “The Twelfth Night.” “The Twelfth Night” is about a girl, Viola disguising as her twin brother, Sebastian and a girl called Olivia starts to like Sebastian who is actually Viola, but Viola likes Orsino who actually likes Olivia, yes it’s all very confusing, so I suggest watching “She’s the Man” to get a better understanding of what “The Twelfth Night” is about. Some of the themes represented through “The Twelfth Night,” are things like troubled love and mistaken gender identity. Still in our days we can experience some of these themes, like love, nearly every girl’s dream is to find their long lost love and in most of Shakespeare’s plays there is at least one person who experiences love. The biggest Shakespeare play that has the theme of love in it, go on guess, I think everyone would know, yes, your right it’s “Romeo and Juliet.” “Romeo and Juliet” is about a boy and girl who fall in love but have to keep it a secret as their families were rivals.

    Shakespeare’s language is still relevant to us as students. Although Shakespeare uses words that most of us have no idea what they mean, for all we know they could be the words that in decades people will be using. Shakespeare’s language is a huge part of the english language now and should be forever. Go to this website and translate english words to Shakespeare’s language. http://lingojam.com/EnglishtoShakespearean

    So, yes I believe that Shakespeare is still relevant today.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Annalise Re said:

    COMMENT
    I really liked Nessa’s blog on Shakespeare and agree with her that Shakespeare is still relevant today! Nessa has written about the themes and language, but her two main paragraphs are on modern movies with the plot of some of Shakespeare’s past, most famous plays! Nessa speaks in a nice and engaging conversational tone. It’s not monotone, so I wanted to keep reading the whole time. She has a good reference to the the timeless themes of Shakespeare and relates them to, once again, popular movies. She also promoted this through descriptive language and adjectives. The only thing I thought she could improve in this paragraph was that her themes and movies sounded like a list. She could spread them out a bit more, in a conversational way. She made a good summary of the movie, 10 things I Hate About You, though it was a little hard to understand, but that was only expected. She had some good reasons for why teenagers relate with it that I totally agree with. It was also a very engaging youtube link! In the next paragraph she talks about the Twelth Night relating to She’s the Man and Romeo and Juliet. I agree with her points on it being ‘every girls dream,’ Nessa seems to have a good understanding of a lot of Shakespeare’s most popular plays and why they are still shown today. I thought she could have put a bit more on the language used though, maybe something on how it affected english today and how we still use lots of Shakespeare’s quotes? Also, I thought it would be good if she included interesting titles, that made me want to read the paragraphs and also know a bit about what’s in them before I start reading. Lastly, I was looking EVERYWHERE for a website that translated! Good find Nessa. I agree with Nessa and thought she made a great, interesting argument about why Shakespeare should still be in our curriculum today!

    Like

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